4 Best-Kept Secret Places in Amsterdam City

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Private Amsterdam Tour Guide
Amsterdam City Attractions

Amsterdam has some of the best-kept secrets situated in and around the heart of the city. Below are some tourist hubs in Amsterdam, which are not easy to find, except if you have a private Amsterdam tour guide to assist you.

A Medieval Prison under a Bridge

The Torensluis is one of the city’s widest and oldest bridges, measuring about 40 meters wide and dating back to 17th Century mid. The vastness of the bridge is courtesy the Tower Lock that actually stood on the place until its erection in 19th Century mid. The remains of the Tower Lock can still be seen both on the pavement of the Torensluis and the prison underneath the bridge. If you go there with a private Amsterdam tour guide, you can see the arched entry to the dungeon now open to public access.

A Buddhist Temple amidst Dutch Buildings

The Buddhist temple Fo Guang Shan seems alluring thanks to its surrounds featuring ancient Dutch buildings. Situating slightly backward from the road and just behind an arched entrance, the temple calls to mind a golden temple from Shanghai right in the heart of Amsterdam city. The interior of the temple is equally impressive and stays accessible to public viewing on Saturdays when guided visits are available, some even including a session of meditation.

A Horse-Riding School in Amsterdam

Around halfway along the Overtoom and adjacent to Vondelpark, you may happen to hear the sound of whinnying horses. Take an entrance and you would be greeted by one of Amsterdam’s unique horse-riding schools with ancient routes. The abode of the Hollandsche Manege is reminiscent of the Baroque period. In the balcony of the horse-riding school is a café featuring a balcony, where you can have tea or coffee while watching the horses trotting around with their respective trainers.

An 18th Century Herbal Store

Jacob Hooy & Co resides adjacent to Amsterdam New Market. The herbal store was launched in the year 1743 by Jacob Hooy, and the store harkens back to an era when both opium and tobacco were considered remedial drugs. The main attraction is a set of barrels, wood drawers, and a serpent figure in the welcome area of the store. The barrels display the Latin names of the spices and herbs on it and still preserves.